05 Oct

2021 Agri-Food Forum

The 2021 Municipal Agriculture Economic Development and Planning Forum (2021 Agri-Food Forum) is being held virtually from November 3 to 4, 2021!

This annual event brings together stakeholders from across Ontario to learn, network and celebrate our diverse agriculture and agri-food sector. This year the event will be hosted virtually by The Regional Municipality of York in collaboration with the Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs.

This year’s theme is enabling “Innovation & Resiliency in the Agri-Food Sector”, with panel sessions focused on agri-tech, entrepreneurship, exploring innovative ways of doing business and building a resilient agri-food sector in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Attendees will also be able to register for breakout sessions on Day 2 on topics ranging from local food initiatives to specialty crop areas, event barns in the Golden Horseshoe and more!

This is a great opportunity for those with an interest in regional and local economic development and land use planning to learn, network and share experiences. Speakers include world-renowned Futurist Nikolas Badminton; Crystal Mackay, CEO of Loft32 and Patti Thompson, Vice-President, Marketing, King Cole Ducks.

Register today and learn more at yorklink.ca/agrifoodforum

21 Jun

Meet the guests at VIEWPOINTS episode 2!

VIEWPOINTS on INDIGENOUS perspectives on CLIMATE
June 24th @ 8pm-9:30pm ET
Join us on Zoom: https://zoom.us/j/91441322243

BETTY BASTIEN
Betty Bastien places Blackfoot tradition within a historical context of precarious survival amid colonial displacement and cultural genocide. In sharing her personal story of reclaimed identity, Bastien offers a gateway into traditional Blackfoot ways of understanding and experiencing the world. For the Siksikaitsitapi, knowledge is experiential, participatory, and ultimately sacred. Bastien maps her own process of coming to know, stressing the recovery of the Blackfoot language and Blackfoot notions of reciprocal responsibilities and interdependence.

Rekindling traditional ways of knowing is essential for Indigenous peoples in Canada to heal and rebuild their communities and cultures. By sharing what she has learned, Betty Bastien hopes to ensure that the next generation of Indigenous people will enjoy a future of hope and peace. Betty is an instructor in Indigenous studies at the University of Calgary. Her experience includes teaching and curriculum design at Red Crow Community College, in the Native studies department at the University of Lethbridge, and at the University of Calgary.

[Photo – University of Calgary]


TERO MUSTONEN

Council Member with special responsibility for Northern Europe and Russia Based in Finland. Dr. Tero Mustonen, a passionate defender of traditional worldview and cosmology of his people, is a Finn and head of the village of Selkie in North Karelia, Finland. He has worked as the traditional knowledge coordinator for Eurasia for the Arctic Biodiversity Assessment. Professionally, he works for the award-winning Snowchange Cooperative (ICCA Consortium Member), which is a non-profit organization based in Finland with members across the Arctic, including the communities of Eastern Sámi, Chukchi, Yukaghir, Sakha, Evenk, Even, Inuit, Inuvialuit, Gwitchin and many more.

Mustonen is a well-known scholar of Arctic biodiversity, climate change, and indigenous issues, having published over a dozen publications on the topics including the ground-breaking Eastern Sámi Atlas and Snowscapes, Dreamscapes. Mustonen has won several human rights and environmental awards for the work with Snowchange and indigenous peoples of the Arctic.

He is the key person to coordinate the Festivals of Northern Fishing Traditions that are organised by Snowchange to connect the traditional and Indigenous fishermen of Eurasia together every two years. The first Festival took place in Finland in September 2014. The second Festival was organised on Lena River, Sakha-Yakutia, Siberia, Russia in September 2016. The 2018 Festival was held in Tornio, Finland. The 2020 Festival of Northern Fishing Traditions was slated for Khanty-Mansia Autonomous Region, Siberia, Russia.

[Photo: BBC.CO.UK, “Carbon-neutral in 15 years? The country with an ambitious plan”]


ALEJANDRO ARGUMEDO

Alejandro is the Director of the Association ANDES, a Cusco-based indigenous people’s non-governmental organization working to protect and develop Andean biological and cultural diversity and the rights of indigenous peoples of Peru.

He is also the international coordinator of the Indigenous People’s Biodiversity Network (IPBN), and Senior Research Officer for Peru of the ‘Sustaining Local Food Systems, Agricultural Biodiversity and Livelihoods’ Programme of the International Institute for Environment and Development for England.

[Photo: SwiftFoundation.org]


GRAEME REED

Graeme is of mixed Anishinaabe and European descent. He is a Senior Advisor with the Assembly of First Nations, where he advocates for the inclusion of First Nations in the federal, provincial, and territorial climate change and energy policy
dialogue.

He has presented to the Canadian Council of Ministers of Environment (CCME), participated in the First Minister’s Meeting negotiating the Pan-Canadian Framework on Clean Growth and Climate Change, and represented the AFN several times at the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change.

Graeme is a graduate of the International Development program jointly offered by St. Paul’s and the Faculty of Environment. He is a candidate for the Rural Studies PhD program at the School for Environmental Design and Rural Development at the University of Guelph.

[Photo: Health Insight – Graeme Reed]


BYRON FLEKKE

My name is Byron Flekke. I’m St’at’imc, from the community of Xaxli’p. I am from the Diablo family. I was raised away from home, in ministry care, in what is today called the Fraser Valley but is actually Sto:lo territory. I am currently living on what I have come to call Occupied Kwantlen Territory. Until a treaty is in place and what is politely called ‘the land question’ is answered, I feel that is the most appropriate way to situate myself.

In light of recent events I feel it is important to note that my siblings and I are the first generation in our family not to attend Kamloops Industrial School, where my mom survived, and I am the first generation to raise my own children. I usually reject the capital “I” Indigenous label, I think people often use it to make themselves feel better when they really ought to be uncomfortable. I prefer and use Indian. I am a husband, a father, a son to my birth mom, and a son to my late white family.

[Photo: LinkedIn]

08 Jun

CCRC Radio/Podcast: VIEWPOINTS episode 2

There are many other ways to see, to speak and to know. Hosted by Byron Flekke with First Nations and Indigenous guests from around the world, VIEWPOINTS episode two will explore Indigenous perspectives on climate. 

Is infinite growth on a finite planet possible? How do we get involved beyond the blue box in dealing with climate change? There is technology that is helping and there is work going on that you might not be aware of.

Come to Indigenous perspectives on climate on June 24th and learn how traditional knowledge is impacting the climate crisis on our one and only home. You will be joining guests from across Canada, from Finland and Peru who will let you in on the environmental work they are doing. The thoughts may change the way you get involved in leaving the campsite better than you found it for future generations. Comments and questions can be sent to info@ruralcreativity.ca


Indigenous peoples are vital to, and active in, the many ecosystems that inhabit their lands and territories and help enhance the resilience of these ecosystems. Indigenous peoples interpret and react to the impacts of climate change drawing on traditional knowledge to find solutions.

UN report on Climate

VIEWPOINTS on INDIGENOUS perspectives on CLIMATE
June 24th @ 8pm-9:30pm ET
Join us on Zoom: https://zoom.us/j/91441322243

31 May

CCRC adopts a kilometer of the G2G!

The CCRC has adopted 1 KM on the Guelph to Goderich Rail Trail. It is in part thanks to the folks at the amazing G2G for their co-producing of the Rural Talks to Rural 2020 conference with us. If you can get out onto this magnificent piece of social and environmentally friendly architecture that takes you into the heart of farm country, the kilometre that we have adopted is at KM 52-53 (from Goderich). The plaque will read ‘adopted by the Canadian Centre for Rural Creativity’ – send us a photo if you do pass by and we’ll post it on our website.


Congratulations to everybody – this project is such a wonder, and to be connected to this remarkable community initiative is an honour. For more information on the G2G and the folks responsible please read below.

“G2G Rail Trail Experience is all about connection. Connection between yourself and others, people and nature, cyclists and hikers, rural and urban settings, beach and buildings. G2G Rail Trail Inc is sustained by an enthusiastic volunteer base that is motivated to provide a sustainable inclusive multi-use trail. All efforts on the trail are funded by private donations and by government grants. With that in mind, the trail is free for everyone to use but can only continue to be maintained by donations. As little of a donation as $5 will add you to our e-mail communications and keep you in touch with all things G2G Rail Trail!” (G2G Website)

For more information visit: http://g2grailtrail.com/

13 May

CCRC Radio/Podcast: VIEWPOINTS

Episode 1: EVERY SNOWFLAKE IN AN AVALANCHE PLEADS ‘NOT GUILTY.’ FASHION and its connection to the CLIMATE CRISIS.

VIEWPOINTS

VIEWPOINTS on the CCRC Radio/Podcast offers unique perspectives on contemporary and global issues. Each session brings people together from different worlds to offer their stories, their experiences, their questions and their gathered insights, on a specific topic. Engaging, provocative, informative, and entertaining, VIEWPOINTS is as much about listening as it is about offering.

The first VIEWPOINTS podcast is about the Fashion Industry and is moderated by Yuddha Maharaj and produced by the CANADIAN CENTRE FOR RURAL CREATIVITY. The episode is called EVERY SNOWFLAKE IN AN AVALANCHE PLEADS ‘NOT GUILTY.’

You will be a part of a conversation that looks at how we got to where we are at, and where we go from here. From the historic, to the contemporary, from the ethics of fashion, to how you can make a difference, this interactive session will have you meeting informed guests from different parts of the world. Nigerian writer Ben Okri said: Change your story and you might very well change your life.

Come to VIEWPOINTS and listen to some unique stories that might have you thinking about changing your own story when it comes to your relationship with your clothes. Comments and questions can be sent to info@ruralcreativity.ca

VIEWPOINTS on FASHION and its connection to the CLIMATE CRISIS
May 27th @ 8pm-9:30pm ET
Join us on Zoom: https://zoom.us/j/92396503366


26 Mar

Arts Survey – Survey link: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/6Y93RVK

Professional Development Survey- Visual Arts
This survey by the University of Calgary involves questions about professional development opportunities and course-based MFA (visual arts) programs. In order to engage the Canadian arts community better, we are seeking information to understand your interests and experiences in these kinds of activities. The 10 question visual arts based survey is open to adults over 18 including, but not limited to, artists, fine craft practitioners, curators, arts administrators etc. across Canada. Thank you for participating!
Survey link: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/6Y93RVK
For more information please feel free to contact Dr. Leblanc at the University of Calgary: jrleblan@ucalgary.ca

23 Mar

RURAL ARTS – check this out

HEY RURALISTS. The CCRC has been approached by some folks from University of Calgary. They are doing a survey on the arts and wanted to be sure to include the work going on in RURAL COMMUNITIES. Take a moment and lend them a hand. THANKS.
Professional Development Survey- Visual Arts
This survey by the University of Calgary involves questions about professional development opportunities and course-based MFA (visual arts) programs. In order to engage the Canadian arts community better, we are seeking information to understand your interests and experiences in these kinds of activities. The 10 question visual arts based survey is open to adults over 18 including, but not limited to, artists, fine craft practitioners, curators, arts administrators etc. across Canada. Thank you for participating!
Survey link: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/6Y93RVK
For more information please feel free to contact Dr. Leblanc at the University of Calgary: jrleblan@ucalgary.ca

06 Dec

R2R20 – it’s a wrap

R2R20 CLOSING REMARKS
Pete Smith
Meghan Hellstern during the media panel at R2R20 offered this to all of us when we consider what we consider:
Is it necessary?
Is it true?
Is it kind?

Walter Lapore during the Wicked Problems panel said this about working alongside community – that it is important to…
Listen
Unlearn to learn again
And remain vulnerable

Dr. Leroy Little Bear reminds us that, regardless of the path we take, when we get to the top of the mountain – we share the same vision. Justice Murray Sinclair asks us to ‘remember, reconciliation is ours to achieve. We owe it to each other to build a Canada based on our shared future, a future of healing and trust. Achieving reconciliation is like climbing a mountain, he said — we must proceed a step at a time. It will not always be easy. There will be storms, there will be obstacles, but we cannot allow ourselves to be daunted by the task because our goal is Just – and it is also necessary.

I want to thank everybody, you the audience, and the more than100 presenters, who took time to offer insights from around the corner and from around the world – and who made civil discourse the pathway for R2R20.

Thank you to our co-producer the Goderich to Guelph Rail Trail, our wonderful Lead Partner LIBRO CREDIT UNION, our sponsors, Cowbell Brewery through their Greener Pastures Fund, Canada Futures Huron, and Huron Commodities. Thank you to the associate organizations, the University of Guelph, Gateway, Canadian Rural Revitalization Foundation, the Rural Ontario Institute, Community Climate Council, Ukai, the RTO4, Fair Finance Fund, and Farmworks.

So. Where are we? and… Where are we going? R2R20 asked both questions of our many guests and each, in their own way, worked toward an answer. Leroy Little Bear talks about how the world is in constant motion – in a perpetual state of flux, that everything is animate, that rather than waking up with the thought what am I going to do, maybe it’s time to take a little time to reflect on the world we inhabit. And as the questions ‘Where are We?’ and ‘Where are we going?’ are always in a state of flux too – it’s tricky to set a single compass point and figure all will be OK with the direction chosen.

We are striving at the Canadian Centre for Rural Creativity, and by extension R2R, to build a gathering place: a place where people assemble and meet others they mightn’t otherwise meet had they not come to the gathering. It is an All Thingy, an opportunity to share ideas, and wisdom collected via experience, and to laugh, and talk about family, and love, and home. It is a place to disagree, but to remember in disagreement we don’t have to be disagreeable.

As we bring the lights down on R2R20 we are launching the CCRC RADIO in order to continue the dialogue that started here – that brought people together that mightn’t have otherwise met – in order to work toward a stronger unified rural voice, leading to a democratic citizen assembly, and positive collective action for a healthier, more sustainable planet.

On behalf of the organizing producers, and all who made this possible, we offer you our gratitude.

Now. Stay safe, stay tuned, we’ll be talking to you all again soon.

(image is The Train by Arthur Dove)